Current Actions

  • Stop Nordic Valley Resort Expansion

    Nordic Valley operates as a small, niche ski area on 140 acres. Recently, however, the resort’s new owners, Mountain Capital Partners, announced that they will be seeking a massive ski area and real estate expansion. If approved by the Forest Service this proposal would:

          Develop 2,800 acres of public land currently managed by the US Forest Service as an “inventoried roadless area” 

          Threaten access to existing, multi-use trails, valued for their diverse recreation opportunities

          Construct a 4.3 mile gondola (1 of 12 proposed lifts) spanning from North Ogden to the resort in Eden 

          Leave the door open for large scale, real estate speculation and development in this bedroom community

          Compromise the character, quality and value of this area as a water source, plant and animal habitat and dark sky region

    The Wasatch Range is an icon for the state of Utah. Protecting the source of our clean water, plant and animal habitat, and the balance between developed and undeveloped land should rise above economic profits for a select few. Traffic congestion and development, removing trees, fragmenting habitat, and inducing high visitation in an area before undertaking a public planning process for the future of this area is short sighted. 

    Currently, there is no formal proposal to respond to however, in the text box below please submit your comments, questions, concerns, or ideas about the proposed expansion of Nordic Valley. Save Our Canyons will use these comments to create materials, inform comment to Forest Service, and educate officials about the communities perspectives regarding this ski resort expansion.  

    For more information, please read "West of Eden; Nordic Valley Goes Big"

  • Central Wasatch Commissioners, Conserve the Wasatch

    Save Our Canyons’ goal with the Central Wasatch National Conservation and Recreation Area Act (CWNCRA), as it has been for all of our work over the decades, is to protect the Wasatch from increasing development pressures while also balancing the growing demand for uses like hiking, mountain biking, and skiing.

    There are currently two important issues that may make or break Save Our Canyons’ support for the CWNCRA over the coming days. To ensure that the Central Wasatch Commission doesn’t mistakenly weaken the Act and in doing so allow a land grab by Alta and also induce an inappropriate use in White Pine we need your action today. 

    White Pine (Little Cottonwood Canyon): Save Our Canyons is opposed to mountain biking in White Pine due to concerns about safety, the proliferation of trails in a fragile alpine area, and inducing more use on an already overtaxed trailhead and trail. 

    Alta Ski Area: We’ve negotiated, we’ve trusted, but now in the final moments, Alta is trying change the rules. They’re pulling land off the table, Grizzly Gulch, land that’s been central to negotiations throughout Mountain Accord and which has been beloved by the public long before it was owned by Alta. Alta has decided to unilaterally reconfigure their land exchange to no longer protect Grizzly Gulch, opting instead to consolidate their ownership of lands to maximize development and minimize environmental protections. 

  • Keep Baldy Bald!

    Because you commented on Alta’s development proposal last May you’re eligible to file an objection to the Forest Service during the ongoing 45 day objection period.

    Let the Forest Service and Alta Ski Lifts know there is overwhelming support for limiting development, ensuring high quality year round recreation and continuing stewardship of our watershed. Approving projects such as a new tram to Mount Baldy or paving undisturbed land is a step in the wrong direction for Little Cottonwood Canyon. 

    Over objections from Save Our Canyons and hundreds of other commenters, the Forest Service approved controversial new changes at Alta Ski Resort. File your comments to support our objection to the Forest Service's approval of Alta's Master Development Plan. Please submit your comment and perspectives to the US Forest Service. Save Our Canyons will also collect comments and deliver them directly to Alta Ski Lifts at the end of the comment period. 

    In the field below, please share your memories and experiences with Alta to demonstrate how these proposals will impact the character of Alta and Little Cottonwood Canyon.

  • Keep Baldy Bald!

    Let the Forest Service and Alta Ski Lifts know there is overwhelming support for limiting development, ensuring high quality year round recreation and continuing stewardship of our watershed. Approving projects such as a new tram to Mount Baldy or paving undisturbed land is a step in the wrong direction for Little Cottonwood Canyon. 

    Over objections from Save Our Canyons and hundreds of other commenters, the Forest Service approved controversial new changes at Alta Ski Resort. Please submit your comment and perspectives to be included in Save Our Canyons "objection" filing submitted to the US Forest Service. These comments will lay the ground work for our defense against development in Little Cottonwood Canyon. We'll also collect comments and deliver them directly to Alta Ski Lifts at the end of the comment period. 

    Our communities depend upon the Wasatch as our source for escape, revitalization, potable water, and inspiration. Alta has been an important member of this community but with these new proposals and the Forest Services approval, they're demonstrating that development and profit usurp irreplaceable habitat, water resource protection and the quality of life for ALL visitors not just those who pay to play. 

    In the field below, please share your memories and experiences with Alta to demonstrate how these proposals will impact the character of Alta and Little Cottonwood Canyon.

  • Little Cottonwood Canyon Future Transportation

     

    PUBLIC SCOPING PERIOD

    The public scoping period runs through May 4, 2018.

    Your comments and questions help shape the process! If you are concerned say something, if you have information about something they are analyzing say it, or if you have an area they should be analyzing, but aren’t — notify them. The more public engagement the better.

    Here is the Dept. Of Transportation, EIS: Little Cottonwood Canyon notice


    For more information PLEASE visit the project site: CLICK HERE and make sure you are following Little Cottonwood EIS on Facebook.

  • Stop the attack on protecting watersheds!

    Its crunch time. At this point in the game, its not the bill number that counts, its the sentiment. Cities, counties, businesses, conservationists, recreationists, envrionmentalists, people of all walks of life know that the Utah Legislature's attack on watersheds and their protection are horrible policy. Doesn't matter if it is HB 135, HB 124, HB 255, or whatever other devious scheme legislators can concoct - we'll fight to the bitter end. And we need you there with us.

    HB 124 takes steps toward amending the State Constitution as it pertains to water and should be further studied. 

    HB 135 shrinks a cities watershed jurisdiction to only 300 feet from a stream, instead of managing for the health of the entire watershed.

    HB 136 restricts a cities abiltiy to advocate for the protection of public lands

    HB 255 prevents a city from purchasing property for the purposes of watershed protection in watersheds outside city limits and incorporates the provisions of HB 135 above.

    Take action below.

  • Stop HB 135: Noel's Wasatch Water Heist

    We need you to immediately contact your representative in the State Legislature to STOP HB 135 and HB 255. 

    HB 135 - Extraterritorial Jurisdiction - would undermine the ability of municiple water providers, such as Salt Lake City and Sandy, to provide high quality, clean water to our communities.

    The bill, HB 135 sponsored by Rep. Mike Noel, was written to give a handful of canyon speculators the ability to make millions of dollars off developing in your watershed. Additionally, allowing for livestock grazing and a reduction of stream protection to only 300 feet from waterways will make it nearly impossible to protect and manage against non-point source pollutants. This bill puts 5 canyon speculators before the needs of over half a million people in the valley who depend on clean drinking water sourced from the Wasatch Mountains. HB 255, sponsored by Rep. Kim Coleman, has been changed to include much of the langauge from Noel's HB 135 and could possibly enact HB 135 should Noel's bill fail.

    Utah's Executive Water Task Force, unanimously recommended that these bills not pass this session. As the Executive Water Task Force stated, while these bills are targeted at Salt Lake City, their ramifications extend to any city trying to protect water quality for its residents and customers.

  • Stop Noel's gag order on conservation - No to HB 136

    Stop HB136

    As you recall, dozens of interests and local governments worked collaboratively to find resolution to issues confronting the Central Wasatch Mountains as part of the Mountain Accord. One central component of the Accord was to pursue designation of the 80,000 acre Central Wasatch National Conservation and Recreation Area, permanently freezing ski area boundaries to protect our public lands from future resort expansion and facilitating land exchanges to protect lands currently owned by ski areas on Mount Superior, Flagstaff Mountain, and Guardsman pass.

    Rep. Mike Noel has introduced a bill that will put a gag order on local governments who want to advocate for the protection of public lands. Of course, entities who wish to oppose are freely able to do so.

    In the past, the legislature has requested that local support be tendered before any public lands legislation be pursued. Now that that bar has been reached in the Wasatch, there’s an effort by Rep. Noel with HB 136 to move the goal post. HB 136 puts an unnecessary obstacle before the governments closest to the people — cities and counties – by requiring a hearing before the House Natural Resources Interim Committee. This bill creates an unnecessary obstacle to achieving locally supported protections for federal public lands.

    Please consider adding your name to the list of people who wish to have their governments advocate for the protection of our public lands.

  • Alta Development Plan. No To Baldy Tram.

    After review of comments from the May 2016 scoping period, the S.L. Ranger District has prepared an "Environmental Assessment" for Alta Ski Area's Master Development Plan (Draft Environmental Assessment). Your comments are needed to help inform the agency about your perspectives concerning development in the head waters of our canyons. Alta Ski Area has 10 proposed "improvements" that include, but are not limited to a new "Flora" lift, relocation of parking on currently undisturbed, riparian/wetland areas and a tram to 11,068' Mount Baldy.

    The US Forest Service is currently seeking public comment on these projects. Because the public notice is both archaic and nearly impossible to read, we at Save Our Canyons have developed an interactive map with info from the public notice. We do this both as a public service and also to inform civic engagement on all issues that impact our public lands, watershed, view shed and impact the recreation experience, both within and outside the resort boundaries. 

    Save Our Canyons Perspective On Environmental Analysis HERE

    Review Alta's Master Development Draft Environmental Analysis HERE

    Comments are due by November 20, 2017

    There is overwhelming support for limiting development, ensuring high quality year round recreation and continued stewardship of our watershed. Approving projects such as a new tram to Mount Baldy or paving undisturbed land is a step in the wrong direction for Little Cottonwood Canyon. 

    Submit your comments and suggestions to inform decisions about land use in the Wasatch Range! 

    Click HERE to review Alta's MDP Improvement Project

    If you have questions please contact Save Our Canyons at 801-363-7283. 

    Please be sure to share this with your friends, family and others who care about the future of the Wasatch Mountains.

  • Committed to Accord

    In November of 2012, a public process was convened by governmental leaders of Central Wasatch in effort to work together to find resolution to many issues in the Central Wasatch Mountains. After three years of public meetings, open houses, and round table discussions an impressive group of often clashing interests emerged with a common vision for the Central Wasatch. It is called the Mountain Accord.

    We still think this is a great plan, full of ideas and proposals worthy of pursuit. Join conservationists, ski areas, recreation organizations, local governments and other parters who have an interest in seeing the Wasatch protected. Our hope is to enact legislation to protect the public lands of the Wasatch for the benefit of wildlife, recreation and our watersheds facing unprecedented threats from a growing population and changes to our climate. We desperately need improvements to our transit systems as these beautiful areas are being degraded by cars. We hope to facilitate land exchanges to protect some of the Wasatch's most iconic peaks. 

    We can't do any of it without YOU! Please join by signing below, and let the Central Wasatch Commission know you want to get back to work in doing right by a landscape that does so much for us!

  • 2017 Session - Support HB293 Senate

      

    Protect your voice in canyon land use issues - Save the Mountainous Planning Commission - HB293S2

    HB 293-S2 Mountainous Planning District Amendments will continue the incredibly important Mountainous Planning District which is charged with planning for the central Wasatch Mountains. The Mountainous Planning Commission is the only planning body charged specifically with looking after the health and integrity of the Wasatch Mountains and helps direct the future of these canyons accordingly. Unfortunately, this vitally important planning commission is set to sunset in 2017 if not extended by legislation. That’s where HB 293-S2 comes in... 

    HB 293-S2, which will soon be heard by the Utah State Senate after already passing the House, will extend the life of this important and successful planning commission until 2020. If this bill does not pass the legislature the protections of the Mountainous Planning District will dissolve and with it the commission's oversight and unique region-wide planning for these mountains, canyons, and foothills.
     
    Since this bill was first passed in 2014 it has had a "sunset provision" so this new commission could prove its worth before being made permanent. Save Our Canyons thinks that the MPD has done a commendable job thus far, especially being that the first two issues it took up were revising FCOZ and working through a complex new Mountain Resort Zone (MRZ) ordinance. The commission is comprised of individuals from surrounding cities as well as canyon residents and has proven itself as a forum for diverse interests and thoughtful debate about the future of the Central Wasatch Mountains.
      
    While the scope of the Mountainous Planning Commission is limited only to privately held lands in Millcreek, Big Cottonwood and Little Cottonwood Canyons, it has significant ramifications for the health, wildness, and beauty of the Wasatch. We believe the Mountainous Planning Commission and its assocated district are a worth while endeavor that needs to be continued.
    Follow the steps below to quickly and easily send your Senator a note on this. Bonus points if your write your own (unique letters have more impact)!
  • 2017 Session - Support HB293 Senate

     

    Protect your voice in canyon land use issues - Save the Mountainous Planning Commission - HB293S2

    HB 293-S2 Mountainous Planning District Amendments will continue the incredibly important Mountainous Planning District which is charged with planning for the central Wasatch Mountains. The Mountainous Planning Commission is the only planning body charged specifically with looking after the health and integrity of the Wasatch Mountains and helps direct the future of these canyons accordingly. Unfortunately, this vitally important planning commission is set to sunset in 2017 if not extended by legislation. That’s where HB 293-S2 comes in... 

    HB 293-S2, which will soon be heard by the Utah House of Representatives, will extend the life of this important and successful planning commission until 2020. If this bill does not pass the legislature the protections of the Mountainous Planning District will dissolve and with it the commission's oversight and unique region-wide planning for these mountains, canyons, and foothills.
     
    Since this bill was first passed in 2014 it has had a "sunset provision" so this new commission could prove its worth before being made permanent. Save Our Canyons thinks that the MPD has done a commendable job thus far, especially being that the first two issues it took up were revising FCOZ and working through a complex new Mountain Resort Zone (MRZ) ordinance. The commission is comprised of individuals from surrounding cities as well as canyon residents and has proven itself as a forum for diverse interests and thoughtful debate about the future of the Central Wasatch Mountains.
      
    While the scope of the Mountainous Planning Commission is limited only to privately held lands in Millcreek, Big Cottonwood and Little Cottonwood Canyons, it has significant ramifications for the health, wildness, and beauty of the Wasatch. We believe the Mountainous Planning Commission and its assocated district are a worth while endeavor that needs to be continued.
  • Protect your voice in canyon land use issues - Save the Mountainous Planning Commission - HB293S2

    HB 293-S2 Mountainous Planning District Amendments will continue the incredibly important Mountainous Planning District which is charged with planning for the central Wasatch Mountains. The Mountainous Planning Commission is the only planning body charged specifically with looking after the health and integrity of the Wasatch Mountains and helps direct the future of these canyons accordingly. Unfortunately, this vitally important planning commission is set to sunset in 2017 if not extended by legislation. That’s where HB 293-S2 comes in... 

    HB 293-S2, which will soon be heard by the Utah House of Representatives, will extend the life of this important and successful planning commission until 2020. If this bill does not pass the legislature the protections of the Mountainous Planning District will dissolve and with it the commission's oversight and unique region-wide planning for these mountains, canyons, and foothills.
     
    Since this bill was first passed in 2014 it has had a "sunset provision" so this new commission could prove its worth before being made permanent. Save Our Canyons thinks that the MPD has done a commendable job thus far, especially being that the first two issues it took up were revising FCOZ and working through a complex new Mountain Resort Zone (MRZ) ordinance. The commission is comprised of individuals from surrounding cities as well as canyon residents and has proven itself as a forum for diverse interests and thoughtful debate about the future of the Central Wasatch Mountains.
      
    While the scope of the Mountainous Planning Commission is limited only to privately held lands in Millcreek, Big Cottonwood and Little Cottonwood Canyons, it has significant ramifications for the health, wildness, and beauty of the Wasatch. We believe the Mountainous Planning Commission and its assocated district are a worth while endeavor that needs to be continued.

  • Central Wasatch Commission 12/12/16

     The Central Wasatch Commission needs your support!

    As the next step in the Mountain Accord process, the Central Wasatch Commission will be tasked with the following objectives:

    • Implementing the agreements arrived at through the Mountain Accord process. 
    • Engaging the public.
    • Creating a diverse Stakeholder Council to ensure diverse interests are represented in the commission’s decision making.
    • Developing transportation improvements and solutions that may decrease single-occupancy vehicle use, and increase biking and walking.
    • Planning and implementing visitor amenities, trails, and canyon stewardship.
    • Protecting the watershed and improving stewardship of the Wasatch Mountains.
  • "Ziprider Attractions?" Not in the Wasatch.

    Snowbird Mountain Resort has submitted a request to Salt Lake County for a 2.75 mile long "Ziprider Attraction." 

    The FCOZ ordinance is currently helpless from stopping this kind of use in the Wasatch but is being re-written. Now is your opportunity to contact the Salt Lake County Council and ask them to strengthen canyon land use ordinances, giving them the kind of teeth which could limit these uses to existing applications and stave off future ones. We all know that one resort getting access to ziplines and coasters in the Wasatch opens up an arms race for these kinds of uses, guaranteeing their proliferation at other resorts.

    In short, we need you to contact the County Council and Mountainous Planning Commission asking for more vigorous land use ordinances, including restricting amusement park style rides in the Wasatch.

  • Coalition supports Central Wasatch Commission

    The Central Wasatch Commission needs your support!

    As the next step in implementing the principles of the Mountain Accord, a multi-year, collaborative effort working to solve decades old land use and transportation conflicts, the Central Wasatch Commission will be tasked with the following objectives:

    • Evaluate, study, prepare reports, and make recommendations concerning the future of the Project Area.
    • Engage the public.
    • Create and engage a Stakeholders Council concerning the objectives of the Accord.
    • Develop transportation improvements and solutions that may decrease single-occupancy
    • vehicle use, and increase biking and walking.
    • Plan and implement visitor amenities, trails, and canyon stewardship.
    • Conserve and protect watershed and stewardship of natural resources.
    • Undertake other efforts to ensure the welfare of the Project Area as contemplated by the Accord. 

    Join Save Our Canyons, Summit Land Conservancy, Mountain Trails Foundation, The Nature Conservancy, Friends of Alta, Salt Lake Climbers Alliance and the Utah Chapter of the Sierra Club in supporting the Central Wasatch Commission. Together, these groups, representing thousands of Utahns, are calling the CWC an important move forward for the greater protection, preservation and enjoyment of the Wasatch Mountains and an important step in realizing the lasting protections set forth by the Mountain Accord process.

    Click HERE to read the full press release and letter of support from these local conservation and recreation groups. 

    On Tuesday, November 15 from 6:00 - 7:30 p.m. at the SL County building (agenda), the County Council will hear public comment on the proposed creation of the Central Wasatch Commission. Please mark your calendar and plan to attend as a strong public showing before the Council in support of the CWC will be integral.

     

  • Uphold strict FCOZ and MRZ ordinance

    The Wasatch Mountains have a long and vibrant history that has helped shape our great state and encouraged millions of visitors year-round. What attracts so many is the balance of an urban city buffered against a wild landscape containing world class in bounds and out of bounds recreational opportunities.

    Foothills and Canyons Overlay Zone and Mountain Resort Zone are the tools that help us ensure that balance. I support strong ordinances to limit development, protect water quality and ensure a healthy ecosystem along with diverse year-round recreation in the Wasatch Mountains, canyons and foothills.

  • Protect Bonanza Flats!

    Tomorrow the City Council of Park City has the opportunity to make a tremendous step towards protecting the much disputed 1,400 acre Bonanza Flats area. Development pressures in and near Park City have been growing significantly for decades and Bonanza Flats, a popular  recreational area, has been no exception.

    Tomorrow, August 11, Park City’s Council will be deciding whether to allow a bond to be posted on the ballot for this November’s election that would create the opportunity for Bonanza Flats to be preserved as open space. This is the single best opportunity to stave off mounting development pressures on some of the most threatened open space areas near Park City

  • Protect the Wasatch: I support the Central Wasatch National Conservation and Recreation Act!

    The Central Wasatch National Conservation and Recreation Area Act is a locally driven, consensus-based bill aimed at protecting the sources of our drinking water, preserving recreational opportunities for the future, and ensuring enjoyment of the Central Wasatch Mountains in the face of pressures from a growing population. The Central Wasatch Mountains are located between Salt Lake County and Summit County in Utah.

    Check out the interactive Conservation and Recreation Area "Story Map" HERE

    This bill preserves approximately 80,000 acres of U.S. Forest Service land including critical watershed, scenic ridgelines, treasured landscapes and recreation areas while solidifying ski resorts boundaries. In this bill:

    • ●  All existing recreational uses and permits will continue;

    • ●  Natural resources and watersheds will be protected;

    • ●  Existing Wilderness Area boundaries will be adjusted for the Bonneville Shoreline Trail alignment and for transportation improvements.

    • ●  Approximately 8,000 acres of wilderness will be added;

    • ●  The U.S. Forest Service will maintain ownership and management of the lands;

    • ●  Land exchanges between the U.S. Forest Service and the four Cottonwood Canyons ski resorts are authorized;

    • ●  Ski resort permit boundaries on U.S. Forest Service land will be fixed permanently after some adjustments through the existing permitting process;

    • ●  New roads for automobiles will be prohibited on U.S. Forest Service land;

    • ●  No restrictions will be placed on U.S. Forest Service management for fire suppression, vegetation maintenance, avalanche control or other emergency measures;

    • ●  Private land within the area or adjacent to the area being designated will not be affected;

    • ●  Future transportation improvements are anticipated. The legislation enables transportation improvements to meet growing demand.

  • Mountain Resort Zone or Pandora’s Box?

     The resorts are trying to blow the lid off of the Pandora’s Box of allowed uses in the Wasatch.

    The planning commission charged with overseeing future development in Big and Little Cottonwood Canyons is on the verge of finalizing a new zone specifically for ski resorts. As you can imagine, the ski resorts’ wishlist for this new zone includes everything from more coasters, slides, and ziplines to skateboard parks, sports fields and additional restaurants. One resort event went so far as to claim that there should be no limit put on allowed uses in the canyons because, “We can’t define everything we may want to do.”

    As you can see, this new zone is at a crucial tipping point. We need Save Our Canyons members and supporters to write planning commissioners and help define what uses the resorts should be allowed in our beautiful and much loved canyons.   

    Commissioners are meeting this Thursday so please submit your comments as soon as possible.

    Now is the time when we either open Pandora’s Box and allow all uses - even those resorts can’t yet define, or we let commissioners know what uses are appropriate in the canyons.  


    For more background on Mountain Resort Zones check out these links to postings on SOC’s webpage.

  • Preserve Cottonwood Heights Open Space

    The City of Cottonwood Heights is reviewing two applications to rezone properties on the foothills near Little Cottonwood Canyon.

    The properties are located near Little Cottonwood Canyon Road on the east, mountain side of the road just before the mouth of the canyon. Two land owners, whose prior requests for a zoning change was defeated in October 2015, are again requesting a rezone from FR-20 (Forest Recreation 1 dwelling per 20 acres) to RR-1-21 (rural residential 1 dwelling per half acre).

    This rezone represents a dramatic change, one that puts these properties significantly out of step with neighboring properties, fundamentally reshapes the character of this portion of the valley’s foothills, impacts wildlife, cuts trail access, and irreparably degrades the gateway to one of our state’s most appreciated and heavily utilized canyons.

    Do you value open space, wildlife habitat, and trail access?

    The Cottonwood Heights planning commission is accepting public comment on the proposed rezone until this Wednesday. If you don't want to see the mouth of canyon significanlty altered by development now is the time to contact the planning commission and make your voice heard.

  • Stong ordinances to protect the Wasatch Mountains

    Dear Commissioners,

    I support a strong Foothill Canyon Overlay Zone ordinance to limit development, protect water quality, ensure a healthy ecosystem that supports flora and fauna habitat and diverse year round recreation in and around the Wasatch Mountains, canyons and foothills.


  • Thumbs up. Traffic down.

  • I support the Wasatch National Monument!

    Tell your policy makers that the Wasatch National Monument is the designation for our lands! The range has qualities of a national park or monument but do not have the protections that those lands come with. Now is the time to preserve the Wasatch Range, from Parley’s to Provo Canyon needs to be put under a recreation friendly, limited development container. The national monument designation is the right fit! Either executive or congressional order could designate the land a monument. 

    A national monument fits our range because of many values that fit under the Antiquities Act of 1906. It is of cultural and scientific significance; there are infinite resources for locals and visitors alikeThe mountains allow for a healthier world. By having access to open spaces we better ourselves through active recreation in a wild space. They are also home to an ecosystem that is the framework for all life. These values are constantly under the threat of development.

    With collaborative processes and discussions in place for a holistic solution to this problem, the time to make our voices heard is NOW! A national monument designation is the tool to protect wildlife and plantlife habitat, year round recreational opportunities, our growing economy and our quality of life. For more details click the map to the right. 

  • Governor Herbert, Stop Gambling with Utah's Future!

    Utahns love our public lands and we cherish the opportunity to pass onto our children and grandchildren the activities they make possible: hunting, fishing, camping, hiking and, for many, escaping the stress of everyday urban living. Our outdoor heritage is a treasured legacy that makes us who we are as Utahns. An attack on our public lands is an attack on our way of life, and that’s why we oppose further attempts by the state legislature to transfer ownership of our public lands to the state and ultimately to private interests.


    Join us as we take a stand together against the take over of Utah’s public land. The Great Public Land Gamble or the Transfer of Public Lands Act threatens to seize 30 million acres of lands that have been held in public ownership for generations. This includes designated wilderness areas, national forests, national parks, national monuments, and BLM lands which are a part of Utah’s heritage and tied to our tourism economy. Do not let the State take over these lands for energy exploration and lock us out of these great public areas which we Utahns have enjoyed for generations.

    Join us at the State Capitol Rotunda on Monday March 2nd, 4:30-6:00pm to tell Governor Herbert we do not want to gamble away Utah’s future!

  • Tell Mayor McAdams to protect YOU and the Wasatch

    On May 29, 2014 Salt Lake County Planning Commission rightly denied Snowbird's request to develope the "Superior Lodge" due to the fact that the lodge was to be constructed on what the Geologic Hazards Ordinance and specifically the provision on Avalanches clearly show as a "red avalanche path."

    The "Superior Lodge" is in blatant disregard of the ordinances in effect in the area, most notably the Geologic Hazards Ordinance and the provision on Avalanches. Yes, Snowbird is trying to build in one of the largest and most significant slide paths in the region - Mount Superior. These ordinances are put in place to protect our environment but also to protect people from hazards.

    Please send a letter to Mayor Ben McAdams and tell him to fix his planning and development department and to include the public in the decision making processes that impact our mountains now.

  • Interconnect-Free Wasatch: Keep the Wasatch Wild and Free!

    Interconnecting the seven ski resorts of the Wasatch is not a new concept; it has reared its ugly head a number of times and with the exception of a few resorts that share boundaries (Snowbird/Alta and Solitude/Brighton), interconnect (regardless of whatever name or marketing spin the resorts put on it), has been thwarted due to overwhelming public opposition. So here we are, once again, with the latest flavor of interconnects. Last time it was "SkiLink", now it's "One Wasatch". What the ski areas fail to see is that there is more to the Wasatch than skiing at or between resorts. We hike, we picnic, we bike, we climb, we fish, we camp, we snowshoe and backcountry ski, we stare at the magnificence of this alpine landscape, we seek to visit a place that remains free from lift lines criss-crossing the skyline.

    For over four decades, Save Our Canyons has fought to protect the wildness and beauty of the Wasatch Mountains. Help us continue this important work and add YOUR voice to protect the Wasatch and keep the resorts within the confines of their existing permit areas! Join us in honoring the compromises of the past and encouraging ski resorts to continue to provide world class skiing and snowboarding on the lands they already have within their Special Use Permit areas and existing resort boundaries. Click here to read more about various interconnects and to view our webmap.

    Save Our Canyons concerns with interconnect range from aesthetic to environmental to social to economic. We’ve heard it from the resorts (as have you) time and time again, “just one more lift…” It seems there is no end in sight for the constant expansion and exploitation of the Wasatch Mountains. At what point does increasing the amount of infrastructure in the Wasatch begin to decrease the experience for everyone?

  • Contact your representative about Wasatch Wilderness

    Send a letter to let your state and national leaders know that Wilderness is important to you, their constituent. You may send the letter we have provided by simply adding your contact information or send your own letter describing why you love Wasatch Wilderness by deleting the existing letter.

  • Protect Wasatch Wilderness! Support HR 2808.

     Wasatch Wilderness and Watershed Protection Act

    The Central Wasatch is a unique and inspiring range, an ecologically significant ecosystem and home to some of the greatest winter and summer recreational world wide. Protecting these areas to ensure the continued health of the watershed, flora and fauna and recreational access is paramount to the future quality of life for ALL Utahns. Which is why we ask you to show your support of Wilderness Designation for these sensitive lands adjacent to our ever growing urban population in the Salt Lake Valley.

    Wilderness is the highest protection that can be placed upon these treasured lands and the only way to ensure their preservation for the benefit of future generations. With a projected doubling of the population by 2050 NOW is the time to let the Utah Delegation know that YOU support the designation of an additional 26,000 acres of prime Willderness lands in the Central Wasatch through the Wasatch Wilderness and Watershed Protection Act. 

    Please join Save Our Canyons to protect the Wasatch mountains, canyons and foothills.